Royalty Across the World

Throughout the world, there are various types of governments and constitutions that represent our homelands. Some have presidents, some have parliaments, and some rely on the representation of the people through the senate. However, royal monarchies have been around since the dawn of time, represented by the titles of their kings and queens who reign over the lands.

In a world where democracy and republics have become the popular style of governing, the image of the monarchy has fallen into the background, replaced by democratically governed bodies. And while these governments continue to work for the people, there is still a place in the public eye for the royalty that exists in the present day.

So first you may consider asking yourself if it is important to celebrate royalty. Why should we celebrate another country’s royal holidays? Perhaps you’re in a new country where the celebration is popularly celebrated. Shops close down and crowds gather to watch parades and enjoy festivals.

While there are those native to their own lands who feel strongly about supporting their royalty and what they represent to the people of the culture, it is also important to consider that royalty has an attraction for people throughout the world. The image of a queen or king can attract those that aren’t native to a nation, and these celebrations find their way into the world news, bringing the world a little closer together.

Under the constitution, Queen Elizabeth II of England has been a reigning figure over the United Kingdom for over half a century. The recent Jubilation Day was celebrated to commemorate the enduring reign of the Queen over more than just the nation of England. Sovereign nations throughout the world fall under the reign of Queen Elizabeth. Australia, Jamaica, Grenada, and Belize are just a few to list. In all, the Queen is head of sixteen sovereign states and is the head of the fifty-four member Commonwealth of Nations.

The recent call for celebration in England commemorated the standing sixty year reign, currently regarded as a Diamond Jubilation, which is the second longest reigning period in the history of the British Monarchy. Needless to say, it was a grand reason for celebration.

However, that is not the only holiday dedicated to the Queen. Australia celebrates the Queen’s birthday on the second Monday of June, commemorating a yearly celebration to honor the leading figure of their governing body. This national holiday is separate from the celebrations that take place in England, and are associated with festivities and entertainment.

Across the land and sea, Japan also dedicates its own day to honor their Emperor. Currently, Emperor Akihito’s birthday marks the celebration on December 23, but the royal holiday actually changes with each new emperor. Known as Tenno no Tanjobi, the celebration always changes to reflect the current emperor’s birthday and has so for the past 2000 years.

With a current government very similar to that of the British Monarchy, Japan’s emperor represents the image of the people and plays little role in the political governing of the nation. But on December 23rd, the festivities take off with public appearances and speeches offered by the emperor, accompanied by banners and flags to commemorate the legacy of the nation, not just the emperor.

There are also countries that celebrate what helped design and create their nation. Norway’s royal family recently celebrated their National Constitution Day on May 17th, which has been one of their biggest celebration events since 1814.

Everybody dresses in the best spring clothing because the spring-time atmosphere results in many outdoor festivities. Children enjoy hotdogs and ice cream while adults stick to cured meats and sausages. Breakfast parties are thrown prior to the parades and following festivities.

Though not considered royalty, even the Presidents of the United States have their own particular celebration to commemorate the services that the office of presidency provides for the people by the people. Other democracies and republics throughout the world also celebrate their own political figures, and though not dubbed the titles of kings and queens, the Office of the President is certainly something to celebrate too.

Regardless of where you are in the world, the celebration of royalty is largely popular, even amongst non-natives. Much like the popularity of the Queen of England’s Jubilee celebration, there were those that wanted to be there but couldn’t because they were traveling. For these reasons, international calling services allow you to stay in touch with your homeland celebrations, regardless of where you are. You’ll have the opportunity to stay in touch with your fellow natives so that you can always take a moment to celebrate your country’s royalty.

**Photograph “64509199 – Prince Harry and Lady Louise Windsor” by Loren Bentes under Creative Commons Attribution

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